Lowongan Pekerjaan

jobs, vacancies, lowongan, pekerjaan, peluang, karir

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  • Published: Dec 3rd, 2014
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RFQ 053 – Provision of Dinner for 250 Pax in Lima, Peru

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RFQ 053 - Provision of Dinner for 250 Pax in Lima, Peru
Procurement Process :RFQ - Request for quotation
Office :UNDP Country Office - INDONESIA
Deadline :03-Dec-14
Posted on :28-Nov-14
Development Area :OTHER
Reference Number :19651
Documents :
RFQ 053 - Solicitation Document
Overview : Dear Sir/Madame, You are kindly requested to submit your quotation for the provision of dinner for 250 pax which will be held in Lima Peru on the 10th December 2014. Please be guided with the attached document when submitting your quotation which should be submitted before or on Wednesday, 3 December 2014 at 1700 hours Jakarta Local Time. LATE PROPOSAL WILL BE REJECTED Best Regards
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  • Published: Dec 3rd, 2014
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IC/UNDP/CPRU-SCDRR/122/2014/Consultant for Baseline

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IC/UNDP/CPRU-SCDRR/122/2014/Consultant for Baseline
Procurement Process :Other
Office :Country Office - INDONESIA
Deadline :02-Dec-14
Posted on :18-Nov-14
Development Area :CONSULTANTSCONSULTANTS
Reference Number :19459
Documents :
TOR
Solicitation
Procurement Notice
Confirmation of Interest
P11
GTC
Overview :
Subject:  Invitation to Submit an Offer for

Consultant for the Development of Baseline DRR – CCA



Dear Mr./Ms.:



The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is currently implementing the second phase of Safer Communities through Disaster Risk Reduction (SC-DRR) project that requires the services of an individual to perform the work described in the above mentioned subject. 


               In consideration of your qualifications, we are hereby inviting you to submit an offer for this particular assignment. To assist you in understanding the requirements of this assignment, we have attached hereto the following:


a)      The Terms of Reference for the assignment described above;

b)      The standard Letter of Confirmation of Interest and Availability, which you must accomplish and submit to UNDP; and

c)       The Individual Contract and its General Terms and Conditions, which you would be expected to sign in the event you are the selected Offeror in this procurement process.  


Should you be interested and decide to submit an offer for this assignment, kindly send them no later than 2 December 2014 to the address below:


United Nations Development Programme



In the meantime, we look forward to your favorable response, and thank you in advance for your interest in working with UNDP.  
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  • Published: Dec 3rd, 2014
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ITB/UNDP/EU/002/2014 (Retender)

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ITB/UNDP/EU/002/2014 (Retender)
Procurement Process :ITB - Invitation to bid
Office :Country Office - INDONESIA
Deadline :02-Dec-14
Posted on :19-Nov-14
Development Area :OTHER
Reference Number :19460
Documents :
ITB/UNDP/EU/002/2014
Overview :
ITB/UNDP/EU/002/2014

(Retender)


Provision of Recovery, Recycle, Recharging Machine For HFC-32 Refrigerant

 Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Phase-out Management Plan (HPMP) Project

UNDP Indonesia
Provision of Recovery, Recycle, Recharging Machine For HFC-32 Refrigerant


Dear Mr./Ms.:  



The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) hereby invites you to submit a Bid to this Invitation to Bid (ITB) for the above-referenced subject. 


This ITB includes the following documents:

                Section 1 – This Letter of Invitation

Section 2 – Instructions to Bidders (including Data Sheet)

Section 3 – Schedule of Requirements and Technical Specifications

Section 4 – Bid Submission Form

Section 5 – Documents Establishing the Eligibility and Qualifications of the Bidder

Section 6 – Technical Bid Form

Section 7 – Price Schedule Form

Section 8 - Form for Advanced Payment Guarantee [disregard, if not required as per Data Sheet]
Section 9 – Contract to be Signed, including General Terms and Conditions


Your offer, comprising of a Technical Bid and Price Schedule, together in a sealed envelope, should be submitted in accordance with Section 2.


You are kindly requested to submit an acknowledgment letter to UNDP to the following address:


United Nations Development Programme 

                                          Menara Thamrin 8th Floor

           Jl. M.H. Thamrin Kav 3

                                         Jakarta 10250, Indonesia                                 

       Telephone:                021-314 1308 ext: 416

       Fax:                          021-314 5251

       Email:                       ardi.winantyo@undp.org and cc to john.benjamin@undp.org

 

       

The letter should be received by UNDP no later than 2 December 2014.   The same letter should advise whether your company intends to submit a Bid. If that is not the case, UNDP would appreciate your indicating the reason, for our records.    


If you have received this ITB through a direct invitation by UNDP, transferring this invitation to another firm requires notifying UNDP accordingly.  


Should you require any clarification, kindly communicate with the contact person identified in the attached Data Sheet as the focal point for queries on this ITB.  


UNDP looks forward to receiving your Bid and thanks you in advance for your interest in UNDP procurement opportunities.
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  • Published: Nov 20th, 2014
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seeking expression of interest: proposal development specialist

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The ASEAN-Australia Development Cooperation Programme Phase II (AADCP II) is seeking proposal development specialist to supply short term/ intermittent support services in the development of project proposals to support the implementation of the ASEAN Economic Community. The contractor will have extensive experience in project proposal writing, a good understanding of program development, and a strong economic and development background in any of the following areas:
•    Investment
•    Services
•    Consumer Protection
•    Agriculture
•    Tourism
•    ASEAN Connectivity

We welcome expression of interest from both overseas and Jakarta-based entity/individual consultants. Further info is attached. Should you have any query, please contact us at personnel@aadcp2.org.
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  • Published: Nov 18th, 2014
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FINAL EVALUATION CONSULTANT – CADRE PROGRAM

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Term of Reference

Final Evaluation of the USAID-funded Cross Sectoral Strategies for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction (CADRE) Program


I.       Background

Funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Cross Sectoral Strategies for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction (CADRE) in Indonesia presents a strategic collaboration between Project Concern International (PCI), KabaHill Centre, universities, consultants, local communities and government to address the needs of 30 communities in three districts – Bengkulu City, North Bengkulu and Kaur – corresponding to an estimated 35,000 people in Bengkulu Province, one of the most disaster-prone provinces in the country. Specifically, the project seeks to achieve strengthened resilience of vulnerable populations in Bengkulu Province to disaster and climate change. This will be achieved through the following three intermediate results:

IR 1. Strengthened institutional capacity for disaster and climate change management. PCI will build the capacity of three district disaster management bodies (BPBDs) and facilitate the formation of 30 Community Disaster Risk Reduction Committees (C/DRRCs) to assess and map risks, develop and initiate Disaster Risk Reduction action plans. By the end of the project, these committees will have been formed, risks mapped and quantifiable achievements made against their action plans.

IR 2. Reduced exposure and vulnerability through adaptive livelihoods. The project will directly support rural households affected by disaster and climate change to proactively begin to adapt livelihoods (i.e. incorporation of crops and methods that build resiliency to disaster and climate change). This will be achieved through the formation of 30 adaptive livelihood groups of 300-450 farmers who will be trained in the principles of permaculture and provided with technical assistance to access capital. By the end of the project it is expected that at least 75% percent of participants will be incorporating adaptive methods into their livelihoods with more than $90,000 leveraged in capital to support these activities.

IR 3. Improved disaster preparedness practices of communities through knowledge and education. The project will improve knowledge and education among targeted communities in several disaster preparedness competencies, including early warning readiness and disaster preparation and response. PCI utilizes a variety of education and knowledge building activities including community radio, home visits, traditional theatre, art and other forms of community education. By the end of the project, all communities will have developed community-based early warning
systems, conducted drills and simulations, and at least 50% of households will have a planned response in case of a disaster.

In summary, key intervention areas are the following:
·         DRR capacity building at the community, government and school level, including the formation of C/DRRC at the village level
·         Information dissemination through various channels, including social group activities, religious leaders, school-based activities, and radio
·         DRR practices through the development of early warning systems and disaster simulations
·         Permaculture training and Farmer Field Schools
·         Small economic development activities for alternative livelihoods such as food processing, livestock, and catfish breeding
·         Advocacy and networking with stakeholders through coordination meetings, seminars and workshops with government agencies, universities, and local entrepreneurs

The program started effectively during the first quarter of 2012 and will end in March 2015. To measure the program’s impact and potential for sustainability, there is a need to carry out a final program evaluation.

II.    Objective of Evaluation

This evaluation shall address the achievement of the program’s goal to strengthen resilience of rural communities to natural disasters in three districts (Bengkulu City, North Bengkulu and Kaur) in Bengkulu province, and the effectiveness of the program design in achieving the program goal.  The detailed project monitoring plan (PMP) with performance indicators is attached.

The evaluation should address the following questions. These should serve as guidelines. The external consultant is expected to refine and adapt the final research questions based on consultations with the CADRE team.

2.1. Overall Program Outcomes and Impact

·         Did the program meet targets and goals related to the performance indicators defined in the Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan?  What were the reasons that key performance targets were or were not met?
·         To what extent did the program strengthen institutional capacity for disaster and climate change management among BPBDs and C/DRRCs?  What have BPBDs and C/DRRCs achieved as a result of increased capacity?
·         To what extent was the program able to reduce exposure and vulnerability to disaster by increasing technical knowledge of, adoption, and income from adaptive livelihoods?
·         To what extent did the program improve disaster preparedness practices among targeted communities through knowledge and education? What were the major factors influencing the adoption of improved disaster preparedness practices?
·         To what extent did program interventions impact women beneficiaries in addressing gender-specific needs to climate change adaptation (CCA)? How did these interventions help women respond to shocks and stresses to mitigate their risks?


 2.3. Relevance of the Design and Program Coverage

·         Was the program design relevant to the targeted beneficiaries?  What are the key determining factors that make this program design relevant?
·         What components of the project design had a positive impact on DRR and CCA, and what components had little/no impact or could have been improved?  Components include: community mobilization, constitution of DRM committees, approach to adaptive livelihoods, linking groups with other stakeholders, partner performance, and technical service provision to groups
·         What is the current program coverage for improving CCA and DRR knowledge and practices? Are there any significant differences across geographic areas?
·         Is the program design replicable and scalable?  If so, what factors will determine where this program can or cannot be replicated and scaled?

2.4. Sustainability

·         Are the groups formed during the program (DRR groups, Livelihood groups, and organic farming groups) functioning independently?
·         Have the above mentioned groups formed linkages to the available institutional and financial resources?  If linkages have been formed with available resources, what outcomes have been generated, and are the linkages sustainable?
·         Have beneficiaries created any innovations based on the adaptive livelihood trainings that could make them more sustainable?
·         Did the adoption of adaptive livelihoods have any negative impacts that would affect their sustainability?
·         What is the current policy environment influencing the likelihood of sustainability for these groups? 
·         Has the program created any “champions” who can continue to lead the process of developing resilient communities?

Through the process of responding to the research questions, the external evaluation consultant is expected to identify lessons learned, challenges and unexpected results to provide concrete recommendations for improved future program design and implementation. The consultant will also document best practices to provide recommendations for organizational learning.


III. Evaluation Design: Sample, Data Sources and Research Methods

Sample Population
The evaluation consultant is expected to propose an adequate sample that will respond to the proposed research questions. The sample should take into consideration all of the following stakeholders:
·         Regional Board for Disaster Management (BPBD)
·         Agriculture Department
·         Food Security and Extension Worker Department
·         Education Department
·         Religious Department
·         Village Committee
·         Representative of economic group
·         Representative of organic farming group
·         Representative of village official and village leader
·         Representative of District official
·         Representative of teacher worked on School based disaster management


Data Sources
Both primary and secondary data sources should be considered in the development of the program evaluation design. Primary data sources should consider the entire CADRE population and appropriate respondents/key informants. Secondary data sources include program source documents, e.g. CADRE contract agreement, work plans, reports (baseline, mid-term, annual, etc.), policy documents, etc.

Research Methods
A mixed-methods approach for collecting both quantitative and qualitative data is preferred. Data should be representative of the program intervention and can include document reviews and synthesis, focus groups, key informant interviews, observations, surveys, among other kinds of research methods.

Quantitative data should be managed using appropriate data management technology and analyzed using statistical software (e.g. R, SPSS, STATA, Epi-Info, etc.).  Quantitative and qualitative data should be presented using the appropriate data visualizations to effectively represent key results. 


Requirements for the External Evaluation Consultant(s):
The person or firm conducting the evaluation should meet the following criteria:
·         Minimum of a master’s degree in  social sciences, climate change, international development, or related field
·         Extensive experience in conducting evaluations using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, with a minimum of five years of experience in this area.
·         Experience in evaluation of climate change, disaster risk management, alternative livelihoods, economic development or a related area
·         Professional experience conducting evaluations in rural Indonesia
·         Experience in evaluating US Government-funded programs, particularly USAID
·         Knowledge/familiarity with Indonesia’s national legislation relating to climate change and disaster risk management.
·         Proven capacity to deliver high quality results within the proposed timeframe.
.
Proposal Submission

For those who are qualified and interested in this consultancy work, please submit your technical proposal along with budget and CV/resume to: Arief Firdaus,  mafirdaus@pci.or.id with a copy to hmaad@pci.or.id  and Indonesia CADRE Final Evaluation as the subject of your email.

Latest date for proposals will be on 28 Nov 2014. Only shortlisted consultant will be contacted for recruitment
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  • Published: Nov 17th, 2014
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IC/UNDP/CPRU/115/2014/ Consultant-Lessons learned documentation

TAGS: None

Procurement Process :Other
Office :UNDP OFFICE - INDONESIA
Deadline :21-Nov-14
Posted on :10-Nov-14
Development Area :CONSULTANTS
Reference Number :19264 
Documents : http://procurement-notices.undp.org/view_notice.cfm?notice_id=19264 





The Enhancing Policy and Planning for Disaster Risk Reduction (EP-DRR) project is supporting the achievement of outcomes under the umbrella of the second phase of the Safer Communities through Disaster Risk Reduction in Development (SC-DRR). As such, the overarching objective is for the Government of Indonesia (GoI) and communities to minimize the risks of adverse impacts of disasters through the application of DRR policies, regulations and practices. EP-DRR is designed to contribute to the improvement of policies, planning and coordination on disaster risk reduction. One of the intended results of EP-DRR is to build a foundation for the application of disaster risk reduction in specific development sectors, including spatial planning. Policy guidance produced by the project is aimed to guide and encourage the local government to invest more in disaster management with their own resources.

As a sub-project of SC-DRR Phase II, EP-DRR is nationally implemented under the leadership of the National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB), engaging the key line ministries of National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas) and Ministry of Home Affairs (Kemendagri) as the members of the Project Board.  In addition to providing joint oversight, each line ministry has a share to produce specific project results in alignment with their respective mandates and responsibilities on disaster management. BNPB, as the Implementing Partner (IP) of SC-DRR Phase II, chairs the Project Board and provides regular supervision and direction to the Project Management Unit (PMU). 

The project supports Indonesian Government in its efforts to strengthen policies for assessment, planning, budgeting, and monitoring disaster management. A key area of work includes support for the formulation of strategic planning documents, such as the Mid-term Development Plan (RPJMN 2015-2019) and the National Disaster Management Plan, including the ancillary Disaster Risk Reduction Action Plan. Through EP-DRR recommendations will be produced to help set up criteria for tracking fiscal resources allocated for DRR. Project assistance is also reinforcing the linkages of disaster risk reduction to climate risks management and spatial planning. This is being done through the provision of policy recommendations to relevant stakeholders. 

Objective of Assignment
The main purpose of this assignment is to document the lessons learned and best practices from the project implementation and project’s key achievements regarding DRR Tracking & Criteria which will be also related to DRR Planning & Budgeting at sub-national level.



Under direct supervision of the NPM SC-DRR the consultant should develop the expected deliverables with detailed scope of work as follow as follows:
1.       Desk Review:
Conduct desk review over the existing documentations that provide information on the current project status. Documents to be review might include but not limited to:
a.       Project Document for SC-DRR;
b.      Quarterly Reports of SC-DRR Project;
c.       Activity Reports;
d.      Relevant Policy products
2.       Interviews:
To obtain more detail information on the report, conduct interview and/or correspondence with:
a.       Head of CPRU
b.      DRR Programme Team
c.       Beneficiaries (Government Officials at national and sub-national levels)
d.      Other relevant  partners (please specify)
3.       Document writing
Compile  and synthesize all information gathered from desk review and interview in a consolidated report using UNDP standard format and template for lessons learned document as explained on annex 1



III. REQUIREMENTS FOR EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS
·         Education:  Minimum a Master degree in Public Administration,  Public Policy, or other relevant fields
·         Experience: Minimum 5 years of experience in writings, development programme, or project management.
·         Language Requirements: Proficient in English language, spoken and written. Knowledge of Bahasa Indonesia is essential.
·         Familiarity in-depth interview technique
·         Advance proficiency in operating Microsoft office applications
·         Strong analytical skills and excellent writing skills.
·         Experience in working with government agencies (central and local), civil society organizations, and international organizations is an asset.
·         Experience in working in/writing DRR issues is an asset
  • Good interpersonal and cross-cultural communication skills
  • Ability to work efficiently and independently under pressure, handle multi tasking situations with strong delivery orientation
  • A good team player committed to enhancing and bring additional value to the work of the team as a whole



IV. EXPECTED RESULTS
Review/approval time required to review/approve the outputs prior to authorizing payments:
No
Deliverables
Payment
Due Date
1.
Lessons learned document and best practices DRAFT
40%              (5 days)
Mid of Dec
2
Lessons learned document and best practices FINAL
60% (7days)
End of Dec

Submit the expected written outputs above in softcopy versions; MS Word (.doc) format including power point presentation when necessary.

All the reports and documents submitted are in ENGLISH


ANNEX 1:

Lessons Learned Paper


What it is: Reflections on past practice and concrete recommendations for improving UNDP’s performance in the future.
When to write it:  Lessons learned should be produced at the end of each project, at a minimum.  Ideally the collection of lessons learned should take place at regular intervals in the project cycle, or when completing a major milestone. 
When to consult it: When designing new projects and seeking experience from elsewhere in UNDP to learn from best practice and avoid repeating mistakes.
Steps:
1.       Research: There are occasions when the research for a Lessons Learned paper can be done by individuals alone. Often, however, it is worth involving others in the process in order to bring in new ideas, critical ideas, and fresh perspectives. This may mean, for example, meeting with colleagues to draw out lessons learned through a facilitated discussion or conducting an After Action Review, and then writing up the main conclusions in the form of a Lessons Learned paper.

2.       Drafting:  Consider who is best placed to draft a Lessons Learned paper – often it is the person who was most involved in the project or activity. Thus, Lessons Learned papers can be drafted by both country office and HQ staff, depending on the activities that they are describing. UNDP HQ staff should include knowledge codification as part of the support that they provide to country offices, making lesson learning an integral part of the design and implementation of projects and processes, rather than a one-off exercise carried out from a distance at HQ.  On the other hand, there are times when an outside eye has its advantages. For example, it may be difficult for project managers to be critical when writing about their own projects; someone less directly involved may be better placed to highlight and discuss both the negative and the positive impacts of the work.
Lessons Learned Papers should be no longer than 10 pages

3.       Reviewing: Ask a few selected colleagues to review the Lessons Learned paper in its initial draft, and to focus their comments on its scope, readability and usefulness. The drafter can request review from a colleague or peer in the CO, any regional centre or HQ unit.

4.       Dissemination: Lessons Learned papers should be shared as widely as possible within and beyond the organization to encourage others to learn from your successes or avoid repeating the same mistakes. You can use the Knowledge Networks, workshops and practice workspaces for this; and/or feed components of the Lessons Learned paper into wider studies and reports on issues, countries/regions, projects/activities, etc.  On the other hand, there are times when limiting your audience will encourage participants to be more candid during the process of reflection. Make sure that all those involved in the process are clear about who the lessons learned are intended to reach.

5.       Follow-up: Lessons-Learned papers, and particularly the section on follow-up recommendations, should be reviewed and updated as circumstances change.

STRUCTURE: Lessons Learned Paper


Title Page
Contents
Acroyms
Executive Summary
Introduction
This section sets out the parameters of the paper, indicates the target audience, and suggests how this summary of lessons learned may be incorporated into other processes and products.
Context/Challenges
Start by outlining the specific circumstances of the work: the country context, including political, security, socio-economic and environmental factors; as well as the main factors involved and the dynamics between them.
  • Briefly describe the specifics of the activity, event, task, project or process: who was involved, the urgency, human resource or financial constraints, etc.
  • Outline what was supposed to happen, what actually happened, and what were the differences: the initial objectives of a policy/strategy, project, activity, event or task versus the actual results. Be as specific as possible from this point on – giving examples from your own or the team’s actual experiences.
  • State what were the consequences or results – both direct and indirect, desired and undesired.

Lessons Learned
This section should be based on an analysis of the experience and context above. It should answer the following questions: ‘if you could do this all over again, what would you do differently?’ or otherwise ‘what is worthwhile  repeating elsewhere’? Lessons learned should be concrete and to the point. Wherever possible, lessons learned should be either be phrased as specific, actionable recommendations; or they should be accompanied by concrete recommendations explaining what should be done, by whom, and by when. This section can be structured by themes, each with a clear and descriptive heading, to allow the reader to easily capture the main issues.
Follow-up
This section outlines who might be interested in learning from this experience. It indicates how the lessons learned will be shared and how they can best be incorporated into future practice. It suggests parallel projects, activities or processes to which the lessons learned could be applied.
Additional Resources
This section might include:
  1. A concise summary of the lessons learned which can be easily incorporated into future reports on the country/process/project/issue, ToRs of personnel conducting follow-up missions, or form part of a presentation to a wider group of colleagues for example.
  2. Checklists to facilitate the process of building lessons learned into future practice.
  3. Related references
  4. Resource people who have experience of the activity, or who participated in the lessons learned exercise, and can provide further information and advice.
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  • Published: Nov 17th, 2014
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Final Evaluation of the USAID-funded Cross Sectoral Strategies for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction (CADRE) Program

TAGS: None

Term of Reference
Final Evaluation of the USAID-funded Cross Sectoral Strategies for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction (CADRE) Program


I.      Background

Funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Cross Sectoral Strategies for Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction (CADRE) in Indonesia presents a strategic collaboration between Project Concern International (PCI), KabaHill Centre, universities, consultants, local communities and government to address the needs of 30 communities in three districts – Bengkulu City, North Bengkulu and Kaur – corresponding to an estimated 35,000 people in Bengkulu Province, one of the most disaster-prone provinces in the country. Specifically, the project seeks to achieve strengthened resilience of vulnerable populations in Bengkulu Province to disaster and climate change. This will be achieved through the following three intermediate results:

IR 1. Strengthened institutional capacity for disaster and climate change management. PCI will build the capacity of three district disaster management bodies (BPBDs) and facilitate the formation of 30 Community Disaster Risk Reduction Committees (C/DRRCs) to assess and map risks, develop and initiate Disaster Risk Reduction action plans. By the end of the project, these committees will have been formed, risks mapped and quantifiable achievements made against their action plans.

IR 2. Reduced exposure and vulnerability through adaptive livelihoods. The project will directly support rural households affected by disaster and climate change to proactively begin to adapt livelihoods (i.e. incorporation of crops and methods that build resiliency to disaster and climate change). This will be achieved through the formation of 30 adaptive livelihood groups of 300-450 farmers who will be trained in the principles of permaculture and provided with technical assistance to access capital. By the end of the project it is expected that at least 75% percent of participants will be incorporating adaptive methods into their livelihoods with more than $90,000 leveraged in capital to support these activities.

IR 3. Improved disaster preparedness practices of communities through knowledge and education. The project will improve knowledge and education among targeted communities in several disaster preparedness competencies, including early warning readiness and disaster preparation and response. PCI utilizes a variety of education and knowledge building activities including community radio, home visits, traditional theatre, art and other forms of community education. By the end of the project, all communities will have developed community-based early warning
systems, conducted drills and simulations, and at least 50% of households will have a planned response in case of a disaster.

In summary, key intervention areas are the following:
•       DRR capacity building at the community, government and school level, including the formation of C/DRRC at the village level
•       Information dissemination through various channels, including social group activities, religious leaders, school-based activities, and radio
•       DRR practices through the development of early warning systems and disaster simulations
•       Permaculture training and Farmer Field Schools
•       Small economic development activities for alternative livelihoods such as food processing, livestock, and catfish breeding
•       Advocacy and networking with stakeholders through coordination meetings, seminars and workshops with government agencies, universities, and local entrepreneurs

The program started effectively during the first quarter of 2012 and will end in March 2015. To measure the program’s impact and potential for sustainability, there is a need to carry out a final program evaluation.

II.     Objective of Evaluation

This evaluation shall address the achievement of the program’s goal to strengthen resilience of rural communities to natural disasters in three districts (Bengkulu City, North Bengkulu and Kaur) in Bengkulu province, and the effectiveness of the program design in achieving the program goal.  The detailed project monitoring plan (PMP) with performance indicators is attached.

The evaluation should address the following questions. These should serve as guidelines. The external consultant is expected to refine and adapt the final research questions based on consultations with the CADRE team.

2.1. Overall Program Outcomes and Impact

2.1.1. Did the program meet targets and goals related to the performance indicators defined in the Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan?  What were the reasons that key performance targets were or were not met?

2.1.2. To what extent did the program strengthen institutional capacity for disaster and climate change management among BPBDs and C/DRRCs?  What have BPBDs and C/DRRCs achieved as a result of increased capacity?

2.1.3. To what extent was the program able to reduce exposure and vulnerability to disaster by increasing technical knowledge of, adoption, and income from adaptive livelihoods?

2.1.4. To what extent did the program improve disaster preparedness practices among targeted communities through knowledge and education? What were the major factors influencing the adoption of improved disaster preparedness practices?

2.1.5. To what extent did program interventions impact women beneficiaries in addressing gender-specific needs to climate change adaptation (CCA)? How did these interventions help women respond to shocks and stresses to mitigate their risks?


 2.3. Relevance of the Design and Program Coverage

2.3.1. Was the program design relevant to the targeted beneficiaries?  What are the key determining factors that make this program design relevant?

2.3.2. What components of the project design had a positive impact on DRR and CCA, and what components had little/no impact or could have been improved?  Components include: community mobilization, constitution of DRM committees, approach to adaptive livelihoods, linking groups with other stakeholders, partner performance, and technical service provision to groups

2.3.3. What is the current program coverage for improving CCA and DRR knowledge and practices? Are there any significant differences across geographic areas?

2.3.4 . Is the program design replicable and scalable?  If so, what factors will determine where this program can or cannot be replicated and scaled?

2.4. Sustainability

2.4.1. Are the groups formed during the program (DRR groups, Livelihood groups, and organic farming groups) functioning independently?

2.4.2. Have the above mentioned groups formed linkages to the available institutional and financial resources?  If linkages have been formed with available resources, what outcomes have been generated, and are the linkages sustainable?

2.4.3. Have beneficiaries created any innovations based on the adaptive livelihood trainings that could make them more sustainable?

2.4.4. Did the adoption of adaptive livelihoods have any negative impacts that would affect their sustainability?

2.4.5. What is the current policy environment influencing the likelihood of sustainability for these groups?

2.4.6. Has the program created any “champions” who can continue to lead the process of developing resilient communities?

Through the process of responding to the research questions, the external evaluation consultant is expected to identify lessons learned, challenges and unexpected results to provide concrete recommendations for improved future program design and implementation. The consultant will also document best practices to provide recommendations for organizational learning.


III.    Evaluation Design: Sample, Data Sources and Research Methods

Sample Population
The evaluation consultant is expected to propose an adequate sample that will respond to the proposed research questions. The sample should take into consideration all of the following stakeholders:
•       Regional Body for Disaster Management (BPBD)
•       Agriculture Department
•       Food Security and Extension Worker Department
•       Education Department
•       Religious Department
•       Village Committee
•       Representative of economic group
•       Representative of organic farming group
•       Representative of village official and village leader
•       Representative of District official
•       Representative of teacher worked on School based disaster management


Data Sources
Both primary and secondary data sources should be considered in the development of the program evaluation design. Primary data sources should consider the entire CADRE population and appropriate respondents/key informants. Secondary data sources include program source documents, e.g. CADRE contract agreement, work plans, reports (baseline, mid-term, annual, etc.), policy documents, etc.

Research Methods
A mixed-methods approach for collecting both quantitative and qualitative data is preferred. Data should be representative of the program intervention and can include document reviews and synthesis, focus groups, key informant interviews, observations, surveys, among other kinds of research methods.

Quantitative data should be managed using appropriate data management technology and analyzed using statistical software (e.g. R, SPSS, STATA, Epi-Info, etc.).  Quantitative and qualitative data should be presented using the appropriate data visualizations to effectively represent key results.


IV.     Application Instructions

Applicants must submit a cover letter, CV, 3 professional references, and a USAID Biodata 1420 form to be considered for the consultancy.  Submit your application to Arief Firdaus, mafirdaus@pci.or.id, with a copy to hmaad@pci.or.id with “Application-CADRE Final Consultancy” in the subject line by 21 Nov 2014.


V.      Requirements for the External Evaluation Consultant(s):
The person or firm conducting the evaluation should meet the following criteria:
•       Minimum of a master’s degree in  social sciences, climate change, international development, or related field
•       Extensive experience in conducting evaluations using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, with a minimum of five years of experience in this area.
•       Experience in evaluation of climate change, disaster risk management, alternative livelihoods, economic development or a related area
•       Professional experience conducting evaluations in rural Indonesia
•       Experience in evaluating US Government-funded programs, particularly USAID
•       Knowledge/familiarity with Indonesia’s national legislation relating to climate change and disaster risk management.
•       Proven capacity to deliver high quality results within the proposed timeframe.
.
VI. Proposal Submission

For those who are qualified and interested in this consultancy work, please submit your technical proposal along with budget and CV/resume to: Arief Firdaus,  mafirdaus@pci.or.id with a copy to hmaad@pci.or.id  and Indonesia CADRE Final Evaluation as the subject of your email.

Latest date for proposals will be on 28 Nov 2014. Only shortlisted consultant will be contacted for recruitment
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  • Published: Nov 12th, 2014
  • Category: Uncategorized
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Sales Executive

TAGS: None

Company
PT Forum Indonesia, authorised dealer for Herman Miller, POSH, EMECO, Arper and Dauphin in Indonesia


Company Description
Since 2008, PT Forum Indonesia (Forum) has been an active promoter of design culture in Indonesia. We have been supplying to multinational and local companies with ergonomically design seating for offices, the F&B industry (hotels, restaurants, cafes and bars) and also designer furniture for retail.

Besides assembling a truly diversified collection of the best brands in the world, our company strives to innovate and reinvent the marketplace with our amazing client solutions. Our services, combined with our professional design and project management team, produce the best solutions in the industry.

Industry
Furniture

Job Position
Sales Executive

Experience
Junior - Mid Level

Job Function
Sales

Employment Type
Full-time

Job Description
A fantastic opportunity has arisen for an experienced Sales Executive to join our successful and growing company.

You will be expected to follow up warm leads, identify and qualify potential prospects through telephone contact, email correspondence, meetings and presentations in order to create opportunities to deliver sustainable business growth.

The ideal candidate will be a well organised individual who will have a sound ability to prioritise, is presentable, confident, articulate, self-motivated and an excellent team player.

Industry specific sales experience is not necessary, as training will be provided but you need to be technically minded.

Responsibilities:
* Contacting new and existing clients and creating new business opportunities
* Visiting new clients to establish needs
* Preparation and presentation of the company's products to new clients
* Building and managing relationships with customers
* Producing standard letters, quotes, emails and other documents
* General assistance to the Sales Department as required

Desired Skills and Expertise
* Sales experience
* Well-developed interpersonal and networking skills
* Excellent verbal communication skills
* Independent self-starter
* A tenacious, driven working attitude
* Target driven and resourceful

ContactSend CV to  ev@hermanmillerindonesia.com
  • Author:
  • Published: Nov 5th, 2014
  • Category: Uncategorized
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Capacity Development Coordinator

TAGS: None

The Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) is a private international, nonprofit, and non-denominational development agency. It seeks sustainable solutions to long-term problems of poverty, with special emphasis on the needs of rural communities in mountainous, coastal and other resource poor areas across the world. Concentrating its efforts in health, education, rural development and strengthening civil society sectors, AKF’s approach is based on a long-term commitment that is maintained despite political and social uncertainty.

The Aga Khan Foundation, Afghanistan (AKF (Afg)) is a member agency of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), a dynamic network of development agencies currently operating in over 30 countries across Central and South Asia and East and West Africa. AKF (Afg) currently manages and implements the largest multi-sectoral development programme within the network and has built a strong reputation with the Government of Afghanistan, donors and local partners in a number of technical fields.
The AKDN is a group of international, private, non-denominational development agencies and institutions that seek to empower communities and individuals, usually in disadvantaged circumstances, to improve living conditions and opportunities. AKF (Afg) is part of AKDN and has been working in Afghanistan since 2002, with programs focused on Rural Development, Education and Health.
AKF (Afg) is seeking a capacity development coordinator to work closely with the HR teams at national and regional levels as well as with the Policy & Partnerships department and sector coordinators.
Main Duties and Responsibilities:
  1. Grants Management: Lead on the management of grants which directly support the initiatives of the HR Department, including grants which are financing the localization strategy of AKF-A.
  2. Develop systems for tracking AKF-A compliance with donor requirements in areas such as staff recruitment, travel, and equity.
  3. Develop and conduct training on donor compliance in close collaboration with the P&P Department.
  4. Resource Mobilization: On behalf of the HR Department, review all proposals to ensure coherence with the HR policies and strategies of the organization. Identify opportunities to integrate AKF-A’s internal capacity building objectives into proposals. Develop HR-related elements of proposals including, for example, Terms of Reference.
  5. Work with the P&P Department and sector coordinators to research and identify funding opportunities to ensure continuous funding for AKF-A’s internal capacity development objectives.
  6. Reporting: Preparation of relevant and timely donor reports as needed, ensuring adequate data collection, relevant case studies and key lessons learnt.
  7. Financial monitoring: Work with the Finance Team to monitor expenditure against HR Department grants, adequately and timely addressing reasons for variance and reporting these to the HR Director.
  8. Policy Development and Roll-out: Working closely with the HR Department and the Policy & Partnership Department, lead on the development and roll-out of new organizational policies in response to donor requirements and emerging needs.
  9. Develop robust consultation processes to ensure that new policies are relevant to the Afghan context.
  10. With the support of the P&P Communications team, develop and implement internal information and education strategies to support the successful roll-out of new organizational policies.
  11. Develop and deliver training on new policies in close coordination with the HR Director and other members of the HR department.
  12. Internal Communications: Lead on the HR Department’s contribution to internal communication products such as the production of the internal newsletter in close collaboration with the P&P Department.
  13. Conduct research on good practices related to organizational policies and internal capacity development.
  14. Conduct visits to HR staff in the regions to assess how new policies are being implemented and how data is being collected on compliance issues.
  15. Support the capacity development of local NGOs on HR-related functions in close coordination with the Human and Institutional Development unit.
  16. To carry out the responsibilities of the role in a way which reflects AKF-A’s commitment to protecting children in accordance with the Child Safeguarding Policy.
Required Qualifications and Experience:
· Master’s degree in a relevant field or a combination of a Bachelor’s degree and at least two years of experience in a relevant field;
· Experience in grants management, budgeting, report writing and/or the development of data collection systems;
· Demonstrated interest in organizational development;
· Experience in developing and delivering training strongly preferred;
· Experience working in a multicultural environment, preferably in a post-conflict one;
· Excellent English written and verbal skills;
· Demonstrated ability to work under pressure and meet tight deadlines;
· Ability to critically analyze and provide constructive recommendations;
· Good team player with ability to build and maintain collaborative relationships with colleagues;
· Willingness to live and work in a post-conflict zone where there may be restrictions on personal freedom.
· Knowledge of Dari or Pashto would be a significant asset.
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  • Published: Nov 5th, 2014
  • Category: Uncategorized
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Assistant Political Officer-Security Policy

TAGS: None

The British Embassy in Jakarta is part of a world-wide network of 230 Diplomatic Posts, representing British political, economic and consular interests overseas. Indonesia and the United Kingdom have a strong relationship, and we work closely together to tackle climate change and promote sustainable growth. In order to strengthen our engagement further the British Embassy is seeking to hire someone who is able to handle a broad range of tasks in the Political Section but primarily assisting with the Embassy’s work on issues of international and domestic security such as counter-terrorism, weapons proliferation, counter narcotics, people smuggling, security sector reform and conflict resolution. This is an excellent opportunity for someone looking to expand their work experience. Experience of working or studying in a British/international environment is preferred.

 
Assistant Political Officer-Security Policy


Job title Assistant Political Officer-Security Policy




Job function Public Relations



Job level Entry Level
Senior Staff




Work location Jakarta



Level of education Associate Degree



Major Any



Work experience Not required



Offering salary Rp. 10.000.000 - Rp. 12.000.000



Posting date 05 Nopember 2014



Closing date 11 Nopember 2014




Address of workplace Jakarta



 

 
Job Description
Job Overview:
Job duties are likely to include: keeping the Embassy updated on developments in the areas of international and domestic security; managing a broad range of contacts at the working level; spotting opportunities for and helping to manage counter-terrorism and cyber security projects; monitoring the Indonesian press for coverage of international security issues. The role would suit someone who has some understanding and knowledge of Indonesian and international security affairs. In addition, the job-holder is also expected to monitor and report on the developments in Timor Leste.

Reporting to the Second Secretary Political, at the British Embassy in Jakarta, the job-holder will be part of the Political Section, working closely with other members to provide input on how security issues impact on a range of cross-cutting objectives, as well as with colleagues in the Embassy's Consular, Defence, Media and Communications, Climate Change, Prosperity, and Trade sections, as well as the British Council.

The job holder will also work with colleagues at other British Embassies in the region and at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London.

Main Duties:
- Understand and report on the Indonesian government's long & short-term policy approaches to security issues, including law enforcement, defence, counter-terrorism, and cyber security.
- Proactive reporting on the domestic and regional strategic security situation and any implications this may have for the UK.
- Report Indonesian government comments on international security developments for example in events in Egypt, Syria & Iraq; Arms Trade Treaty; Iran; Counter Proliferation.
- Comment on developments in Timor Leste, and provide support to Embassy visits.
- Maintain an excellent network of working level contacts; across government, academia, politics, private sector & civil society.
- Spot innovative opportunities to help deliver UK policy priorities & offer advice on handling any asso
Requirement
Requirements:
- A degree majoring in subjects such as International Relations, International Security, or Politics is essential; a post-graduate degree is desirable
- Excellent communication and networking skills in English and Indonesian (both oral and written, IELTS 6.5 or higher)
- Good IT skills and experience, including MS Office
- Excellent understanding of Indonesian security and defence policy
- Self-motivation and the ability to work under very light supervision
- Strong interpersonal and team-working skills
- An understanding of international relations and familiarity with the UK would be an advantage

Key Competences Required:
- Collaborating and Partnering
- Delivering at Pace
- Seeing the Big Picture
- Leading and Communicating
- Managing a Quality Service

Salary
The British Embassy is an equal opportunities employer. We will offer a generous package of salary starting at IDR 11,039,333 per month and benefits, including annual leave and medical cover, commensurate with qualifications and experience. Evidence of previous salary awards should be provided along with the application. Training opportunities may also be available.

Employment offers are subject to successful clearance of pre-employment checks. In relation to this, the successful candidate will need to arrange his/her own Police Certificate. You must also have the permit to work in Indonesia in order to apply.

To Apply

Please send your CV and the completed application form, which can be downloaded from our website at https://www.gov.uk/government/world/organisations/british-embassy-jakarta/about/recruitment by 17 November 2014 to:

indonesia.recruitment@fco.gov.uk

No accommodation or relocation expenses are payable in connection with this position. Please note that incomplete applications will not be taken into consideration. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

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